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" I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,... "
The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere - Page 240
by William Shakespeare - 1851
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Discoveries in Hieroglyphics and Other Antiquities, Volume 2

Robert Deverell - 1813
...moulting them. have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercise; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o' erhanging firmament,...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1814
...and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not), lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems tu me a steril promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 44

England - 1838
...The last paragraph is admirable — but the first is wondrous — and would have entranced Hamlet. " I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not) lost all...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave, o'erhanging firmament,...
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Blackwood's Magazine

1829
...allusion to the indolence and lethargy which so commonly accompany obesity. ' I have of late,' he says, ' but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, foregone...and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition,' &c. &c. Now what is this, I would fain know, if it be not the natural complaint of a man suffering...
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The Family Shakspeare: In Ten Volumes; in which Nothing is Added ..., Volume 10

William Shakespeare - 1818
...and queen moult no feather. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, It goes so...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look '•ON, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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The Plays of Shakspeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1819
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to л me a steril promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'er-hanging...
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Nugae Canorae: Poems

Charles Lloyd - 1819 - 332 pages
...Written, nth and 28th June, 1819. " I HAVE, of late, lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercise ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, this brave o'erhanging, this majestical roof,...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1821
...two friends, who were set over him as spies. (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so...the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament 3, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire 4, why, it appears no other thing * to me, than a...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: To which are Added His ...

William Shakespeare - 1821
..."and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not), lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a steriI promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmmnent,...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1823
...and queen moult no feather. I hare of late (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so...brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretteH with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me, than a foul and pestilent congregation...
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