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" I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,... "
The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere - Page 240
by William Shakespeare - 1851
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Stages and Playgoers: From Guild Plays to Shakespeare

Janet Hill - Drama - 2002 - 241 pages
...surroundings. For instance, Hamlet speaks these lines: this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look...firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, 59 why it appeareth nothing to me but a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours. (2.2.298-303) [my...
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Shakespeare's Tragic Skepticism

Millicent Bell - Literary Criticism - 2002 - 283 pages
...I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercise; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory. This most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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Amleto

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1995 - 320 pages
...feather. I bave of late - but wheiefore I know not - lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of esercises. And indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame the earth seems to me a sterile promontory. This most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhangiog firmament,...
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Shakespeare and the History of Soliloquies

James E. Hirsh - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 470 pages
...which occurs in the immediately preceding scene: this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look...majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appeareth nothing to me but a foul and pestilent congregation of vapors. What a piece of work is a...
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Shakespeare and the Human Mystery

J. Philip Newell - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 134 pages
...the wonder of creation and the mystery of humanity, he says to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, , . . This most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this...majestical roof fretted with golden fire - why, it appears nothing to me but a foul pestilent congregation of vapours. What a piece of work is man, how noble...
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Unifying the Universe: The Physics of Heaven and Earth

Hasan S. Padamsee - Science - 2002 - 668 pages
...activity, and most of all its renewed pride and individualism [28]. This goodly frame, the earth. . . , This most excellent canopy, the air,. . . Look you,...firmament, This majestical roof fretted with golden fire. . . What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason! How infinite in faculty! In form and moving...
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The Kendall/Hunt Anthology: Literature to Write About

K. H. Anthol - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2003 - 313 pages
...I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercise; and indeed it goes so [heavily] with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory, this most excellent 310 canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging [firmament]...
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Shakespeare at the Cineplex: The Kenneth Branagh Era

Samuel Crowl - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 254 pages
..."I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth; forgone all custom of exercise; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory. This most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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Codierungen von Emotionen im Mittelalter

Steven Carl Jaeger, C. Stephen Jaeger, Ingrid Kasten, Niklaus Largier, Hendrijke Haufe, Andrea Sieber, Mireille Schnyder - Literary Criticism - 2003 - 313 pages
...I have of late — but wherefore I know not — lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercise; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory. This most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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Mental Diseases and Their Modern Treatment

S. H. Talcott - Medical - 2004 - 309 pages
...that has "come o'er him like a summer's cloud". In the language of Shakespeare, he may say to himself: "I' have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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