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" I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,... "
The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere - Page 240
by William Shakespeare - 1851
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1838
...cathcr. 1-have of late (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, Spare. (2) Overtook. forgone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so...air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestjcal roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me, than a foul and pestilent...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 44

Scotland - 1838
...The last paragraph is admirable—- but the first is wondrous — and would have entranced Hamlet. " I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not) lost all...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave, o'erhanging firmament,...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 7

1838
...— but the first is wondrous — and would have entranced Hamlet. "I have of late (but, wherefore, 1 know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave, o'erhanging firmament,...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: King Lear. Romeo and Juliet ...

William Shakespeare - 1839
...king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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Gawthrop's journal of literature, science, and arts

...' I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth — foregone all costom of exercise, and indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a promontory — this most excellent canopy, the air — look you — this brave o'erhanging firmament...
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Knight's Cabinet edition of the works of William Shakspere, Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1843
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery of your secrecy to the king and queen. Moult no feather. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost...canopy, the air, look you, — this brave o'erhanging* — this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me, than a foul...
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William Shakspere: A Biography, Book 2

Charles Knight - 1843 - 542 pages
...is an unweeded garden That grows to seed ; things rank, and gross in nature, Possess it merely. " . Again : — " I have of late (but, wherefore, I know...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a * Hallam's ' Literature of Europe,' vol. iii., p. 568. t Mr. I 1 iilliim iefers to Hamlet in iU altered...
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The works of William Shakespeare, the text formed from an entirely ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1843
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secresy3 to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late, (but wherefore I know not) lost all...exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition4, that this goodly frame, the earth, 1 — I am most dreadfully attended.] Here ends an...
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The Elements of Moral Science: Revised and Stereotyped

Francis Wayland - 1843
...This state of mind has, I think, been ascribed to Hamlet by Shakspeare, in the following passage: " I have, of late (but wherefore I know not), lost all...exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my dispositions, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent...
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The Works of William Shakspeare: The Text Formed from an Intirely ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1843
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secresy5 to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late, (but wherefore I know not) lost all...exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition4, that this goodly frame, the earth, t — I am most dreadfully attended.] Here ends an...
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