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" I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,... "
The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere - Page 240
by William Shakespeare - 1851
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1843
...king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you,— this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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The Works of Shakespere, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1843
...king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you,— this hrave o'erhanging firmament,...
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An Essay on the Tragedy of Hamlet: Embracing a View of Hamlet's Character ...

Patrick MacDonell - 1843 - 79 pages
...beautiful but sombre reflections. " I have of late, (but, wherefore I know not,) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises: and indeed it goes so heavily...disposition, that this goodly frame the earth, seems to me to be a steril promontory;—this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'er-hanging...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Printed from the Text ..., Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1844
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secresy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late , (but wherefore I know not) lost all...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy , the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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The American Class-reader: Containing a Series of Lessons in Reading; with ...

George Willson - American literature - 1844 - 288 pages
...a meeting-house ! I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all customs of exercises, and indeed, it goes so heavily with...disposition, that this goodly frame the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excel lent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 1

American literature - 1865
...: " I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercise ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you — this brave overhanging tirmament...
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The rhetorical reader, consisting of choice specimens of oratorical ...

John Hall Hindmarsh - 1845 - 80 pages
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secrecy to the king and queen moult no feather. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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The Select Works of Mrs. Ellis ...

Sarah Stickney Ellis - English literature - 1845
...indeed, it goee so heavily with tny disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,...majestical roof, fretted with golden fire, why, it appeare no other thing to me, than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours. What a piece of work...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1847
...nothing. * Nay, then I have an eye of you;} An eye of you means, I have a glimpse of your meaning. x 2 wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, foregone...this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this hrave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other...
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Shakespeare's Plays: With His Life, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1847
...shall my anticipation prevent your discovery, and your secresy to the king and queen moult no feather. sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
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