Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air,... "
The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere - Page 240
by William Shakespeare - 1851
Full view - About this book

The Poetry and Poets of Britain: From Chaucer to Tennyson ; with ...

Daniel Scrymgeour - English poetry - 1850 - 528 pages
...MELANCHOLY. I have of late, bnt wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all enstom of exereise ; and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a DETACHED PIECES. 133 sterile promontory ; this mo?t exeellent eanopy the air, look yon, this brave...
Full view - About this book

Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - 1851 - 418 pages
...cold fruitless moon. MN i. 1. My cue is rillanous melancholy, with a sigh like Tom o' Bedlam. KL i. 2. I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
Full view - About this book

The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1851
...king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
Full view - About this book

The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so...'that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
Full view - About this book

THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE; ILLISTRATED: EMBRACING A LIFE OF ...

1851
...king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
Full view - About this book

The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1851 - 345 pages
...prison. REFLECTIONS Otf KAN. I have of late, (but, wherefore, I know not,) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises: and indeed, it goes so heavily...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
Full view - About this book

Guy's new speaker, selections of poetry and prose from the best writers in ...

Joseph Guy - 1852
...follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man. HAMLET DESCRIBES HIS MELANCHOLY. I HAVE of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this B most excellent canopy, the air, look you, — this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
Full view - About this book

Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 418 pages
...i. 1. My cue is villanous melancholy, with a sigh like Tom o' Bedlam. KL i. 2. I have of late (hut wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
Full view - About this book

The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with ..., Part 166, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...king and queen moult no feather. I have of late (but wherefore I know not) lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and, indeed, it goes so...disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you,— this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
Full view - About this book

Border Lands: The Best of David Adam's Celtic Vision

David Adam - Religion - 1999 - 244 pages
...Hamlet: I have of late - but wherefore I know not - lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercise; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament,...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF