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" Or slow distemper, or neglected love, (And so, poor wretch ! filled all things with himself, And made all gentle sounds tell back the tale Of his own sorrow) he, and such as he, First named these notes a melancholy strain. And many a poet echoes the conceit... "
Every Saturday: A Journal of Choice Reading - Page 19
1867
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Coleridge and the Uses of Division

Fellow and Tutor Balliol College Lecturer English Faculty Seamus Perry, Seamus (Lecturer in English Literature Perry, Lecturer in English Literature University of Glasgow), Seamus Perry - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 303 pages
...Nightingale' Coleridge explicitly contrasts the projective self-absorption of the loveless poet who 'poor wretch! filled all things with himself, / And made all gentle sounds tell hack the tale / Of his own sorrow', with the right way of carrying on: 'to the influxes / Of shapes...
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Selected Poetry

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Poetry - 2002 - 256 pages
...some night-wandering man whose heart was pierced With the remembrance of a grievous wrong, Or slow distemper, or neglected love, (And so, poor wretch!...himself, And made all gentle sounds tell back the tale 20 Of his own sorrow) he, and such as he, First named these notes a melancholy strain. And many a poet...
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Lyrical Ballads and Other Poems

William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Ballads, English - 2003 - 312 pages
...some night-wandering man whose heart was pierced With the remembrance of a grievous wrong, Or slow distemper, or neglected love (And so, poor wretch! filled all things with himself, And made all gende sounds tell back the tale 20 Of his own sorrow), he, and such as he, First named these notes...
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Coleridge and Shelley: Textual Engagement

Sally West - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 197 pages
...is a '"most melancholy" Bird', by visualizing the 'poor Wretch' who, in his own melancholy, 'fill'd all things with himself/ And made all gentle sounds tell back the tale/ Of his own sorrow' (19-21)." In 'This LimeTree Bower', Coleridge dramatizes the movement from just such a position to...
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