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" The green hath two pleasures ; the one, because nothing is more pleasant to the eye than green grass kept finely shorn ; the other, because it will give you a fair alley in the midst, by which you may go in front upon a stately hedge, which is to enclose... "
Bacon's Essays - Page 56
by Francis Bacon - 1881
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The Essays Or Counsels, Civil and Moral of Francis Bacon, Lord Verulam ...

Francis Bacon - Conduct of life - 1905 - 318 pages
...besides alleys, on both sides. And I like well, that four acres of ground be assigned to the green ; six to the heath ; four and four to either side ;...you a fair alley in the midst, by which you may go in front upon a stately hedge, which is to enclose the garden. But, because the alley will be long,...
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The Essays, Or Counsels, Civil and Moral of Francis Bacon, Lord Verulam ...

Francis Bacon - 1905 - 318 pages
...besides alleys on both sides. And I like well that four acres of ground 25 be assigned to the green, six to the heath, four and four to either side, and...finely shorn; the other, because it will give you a so fair alley in the midst, by which you may go in front upon a stately hedge, which is to enclose...
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An Angler's Hour

Hugh Tempest Sheringham - Fishing - 1905 - 264 pages
...have been here is the essay on gardens. It now lies open on the grass beside me at this passage : " The Green hath two pleasures. The one because nothing...you a fair alley in the midst, by which you may go in front upon a stately hedge, which is to enclose the garden." Bacon had a fine feeling for grass,...
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An Angler's Hours

Hugh Tempest Sheringham - Fishing - 1905 - 264 pages
...have been here is the essay on gardens. It now lies open on the grass beside me at this passage : " The Green hath two pleasures. The one because nothing...you a fair alley in the midst, by which you may go in front upon a stately hedge, which is to enclose the garden." Bacon had a fine feeling for grass,...
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The Essayes Or Counsels Civill and Morall of Francis Bacon, Lord Verulam

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1907 - 199 pages
...besides alleys on both sides. And I like well that four acres of ground be assigned to the green ; six to the heath ; four and four to either side ;...you a fair alley in the midst, by which you may go in front upon a stately hedge, which is to enclose the garden. But because the alley will be long,...
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A Book of English Gardens

M. R. Gloag - Gardens - 1906 - 340 pages
...square, encompassed on all the four sides with a stately arched hedge." There must also be "green," " because nothing is more pleasant to the eye than green grass kept finely shorn " ; and fountains, " for they are a great beauty and refreshment " ; also, "you are to frame some of...
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London Parks and Gardens

Alicia Margaret Tyssen-Amherst Cecil Rockley (Baroness.), Mrs. Evelyn Cecil - Parks - 1907 - 384 pages
...hand is not difficult to imagine. The fair alleys, the great hedge, were essentials, and the green, " because nothing is more pleasant to the eye than green grass kept finely shorn." His list of plants which bloom in all the months of the year was compiled of those specially suited...
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The Essays of Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1908 - 293 pages
...well that four acres of ground be assigned to the green ; six to the heath ; four and four to either 4 side ; and twelve to the main garden. The green hath two pleasures : the iBurnet. The popular name of plants belonging to the genera Sanguisorba and Poterium, of the Rosaceae,...
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Essays

Francis Bacon - 1908 - 302 pages
...; Six to the Heath, Foure and Foure to either Side ; 90 And Twelve to the Maine Garden. The Greene hath two pleasures; The one, because nothing is more Pleasant to the Eye then Greene Grasse kept finely shorne"; The other-j because it will give you a faire Alley in the midst,...
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The Living Age, Volume 256

1908
...for the cultivation of trees, plants, and, above all, turf. "Nothing," said the great Lord Verulam, "is more pleasant to the eye than green grass kept finely shorn." He had his ideas on that and other horticultural matters carried out in the grave gardens of Gray's...
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