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" Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false valuations, imaginations as one would, and the like, but it would leave the minds of a number of men poor shrunken things, full of melancholy and indisposition,... "
The Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: With an Introductory Essay ... - Page 23
by Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1853
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The Eclectic Museum of Foreign Literature, Science and Art, Volume 2

John Holmes Agnew, Eliakim Littell - American periodicals - 1843
...valuations, imaginations as one would say, and the like vinum Dœmonum, (as a Father calleth poetry,) but it would leave the minds of a number of men poor...melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing to themselves 1" It would now be more to the purpose to inquire, what is likely to be the effect of living in an...
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The Edinburgh Review, Volume 43; Volume 77

English literature - 1843
...valuations, ima' ginations as one would say, and the like vinum Dannonum, (as a ' Father calleth poetry,) but it would leave the minds of a number ' of men poor shrunken things, full of melancholy and indisposi' tion, and unpleasing to themselves ?' It would now be more to the purpose to enquire, what...
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Sketches of the History of Literature and Learning in England ..., Volumes 5-6

George Lillie Craik - English language - 1845
...lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man doubt, that, if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing to themselves ?" Swift, with the phraseology of this passage apparently running in his head, goes on to condemn the...
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Class Book of Prose: Consisting of Selections from Distinguished English and ...

John Seely Hart - Readers - 1845 - 372 pages
...A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man ever doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing to themselves ? But it is not the lie that passeth through the mind, but the lie that sinketh in, and settleth in...
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The Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: Prose and Verse

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1845 - 546 pages
...falee valuations, imaginations at one i-ould, and the like vinum Dœmonum {as a Father calleth poetry) Ye, as ye pass, toss high the des 0 * Л melancholy, a loo general, but not, I trust, a universal truth ! — and even where it does apply,...
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Bacon: His Writings, and His Philosophy

George Lillie Craik - 1846
...lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing to themselves. One of the Fathers, in great severity, called poesy ' Vinum Daemonum,'* because it filleth the imagination,...
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Bacon: His Writings, and His Philosophy, Volume 1

George Lillie Craik - 1846
...lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...things, full of melancholy and indisposition, and unpleaslng to themselves. One of the Fathers, in great severity, called poesy ' Vinum Daemonnm,'* because...
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THE BRITISH AND FOREIGN MEDICAL REVIEW OR QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF PRACTICAL ...

john forbes - 1846
...applicable who will fear the light of truth : ' Doth any man doubt that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...the minds of a number of men poor shrunken things, and unpleasiug to themselves ' " Nothing can be more injurious to the true interest of medicine than...
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Bacon: His Writings, and His Philosophy

George Lillie Craik - 1846
...lights. A mixture of a lie doth ew add pleasure. Doth any man douht, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...valuations, imaginations as one would, and the like; hut it would leave the minds of a numher of men, poor shrunken thingsfull of melancholy and indisposition,...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: With a ..., Volume 1

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1848
...lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds, vain opinions, flattering hopes, false valuations, imaginations as one would, and the likt, but it would leave the minds of a number of men, poor shrunken things, full of melancholy and...
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