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" Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false valuations, imaginations as one would, and the like, but it would leave the minds of a number of men poor shrunken things, full of melancholy and indisposition,... "
The Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: With an Introductory Essay ... - Page 23
by Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1853
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The Works of Francis Bacon ...: Literary and professional works

Francis Bacon - 1858
...lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...would, and the like, but it would leave the minds 1 Cogitatimum vertigine. * inytnia quadam ventota ct ditcuriantia. * KM qua t* t& ia 1 1 Hi -i cogitaiionibtu...
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The essays; or, Counsels civil and moral, with The wisdom of the ancients ...

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1857
...Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of Men's Minds vain Opinions, flattering Hopes, falfe Valuations, Imaginations as one would, and the like...but it would leave the Minds of a Number of Men poor fhrunken Things, full of Melancholy and Indifpofition, and unpleafing to themfelves ? One of the Fathers,3...
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Bacon's Essays

Francis Bacon, Richard Whately - English essays - 1858 - 588 pages
...taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false valuations, imaginations as one would,1 and the like, but it would leave the minds of a number...melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing" to themselves ? One of the fathers, in great severity, called poesy ' vinum daemonum," because it filleth the imagination,...
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Works: Collected and Edited by James Spedding, Robert Leslie Ellis ..., Volume 6

Francis Bacon - 1858
...lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth arfy man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...would, and the like, but it would leave the minds ' CogitatioHum vertiyine. * ingenia quadam ventota et dĪKurtantia. * пес уча ex eā inventa...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Volume 6

Francis Bacon - 1858
...lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...would, and the like, but it would leave the minds i Cogitalicnam rertigins. * inslenia qutedam venfota et discursantiu. 9 nee qua: ex tu inventn cogltationibut...
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The Harvard Classics, Volume 3

Literature - 1909
...lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...imaginations as one would, and the like, but it would 1 Loving. ' The Skeptics. * Latin, windy and rambling. * Restricts. ' Lucian. leave the minds of a...
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Francis Bacon: Discovery and the Art of Discourse

Lisa Jardine, Professor of Renaissance Studies Lisa Jardine - Science - 1974 - 267 pages
...lying - day-to-day misrepresentation of facts: Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing to themselves? [VI, 377] The observation that unrelenting truthfulness in appraisal of a man's situation would produce...
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Ceremony and Civility in English Renaissance Prose

Anne Drury Hall - Literary Criticism - 2010
...lights. A mixture of a lie doth ever add pleasure. Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing to themselves? 95 Nor is it Gibbon's in his description of the monastic saints: The favourites of Heaven were accustomed...
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Terms of Response: Language and the Audience in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth ...

Robert L. Montgomery - Literary Criticism - 2010
...pleasure. Doth any man doubl. that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, ftattering hopes, false valuations. imaginations as one would,...but it would leave the minds of a number of men poor shranken things. full of melancholy and indisposiiion, and anplrasing to themselves? —Francis Bacon,...
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Melville and Repose: The Rhetoric of Humor in the American Renaissance

John Bryant - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 336 pages
...impeding consciousness, smooths its flow. He writes: Doth any man doubt that, if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false...melancholy and indisposition and unpleasing to themselves. 8 We are shrunken things without our "imaginations," but in confusing "false valuations" with true,...
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