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" A quibble is the golden apple for which he will always turn aside from his career or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight that he was content to purchase it by the sacrifice of reason, propriety, and truth.... "
The British Plutarch: Containing the Lives of the Most Eminent Divines ... - Page 311
by Francis Wrangham - 1816
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One Touch of Shakespeare: Letters of Joseph Crosby to Joseph Parker Norris ...

Joseph Crosby - Antiques & Collectibles - 1986 - 359 pages
...Whatever be the dignity or profundity of his disquisitions, whatever be the enlarging knowledge, or the exalting affection, whether he be amusing attention...he will always turn aside from his career, or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight, that he was content...
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Chaosmos: Literature, Science, and Theory

Philip Kuberski - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 211 pages
...scientific clarity. Dr. Johnson was dismayed by Shakespeare's eagerness to play with words and make puns: "A quibble is the golden apple for which he will always turn aside from his career or step from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight that he was content...
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William Shakespeare: The Critical Heritage, Volume 5

Brian Vickers - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 568 pages
...him in the mire. It has some malignant power over his mind, and its fascinations are irresistible. Whatever be the dignity or profundity of his disquisition,...he will always turn aside from his career, or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight that he was content...
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The Re-imagined Text: Shakespeare, Adaptation, & Eighteenth-century Literary ...

Jean I. Marsden - Drama
...and its fascinations are irresistible. Whatever be the dignity or profundity of his disquisitions, whether he be enlarging knowledge or exalting affection,...he will always turn aside from his career or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight that he was content...
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Shakespeare and Sexuality

Wells - Literary Collections - 2001 - 207 pages
...deflected by the 'irresistible' fascinations of the feminized quibble. For the heroic, manly playwright, 'a quibble is the golden apple for which he will always turn aside from his career, or stoop from his elevation'.3 In employing this terminology of swerve, fall, and decline, Johnson touches on...
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Popes and Politics: Reform, Resentment, and the Holocaust

Justus George Lawler - Religion - 2004 - 256 pages
...provedly "true to life." Johnson wrote: "Whatever be the dignity or profundity of his disquisition . . . , let but a quibble spring up before him, and he leaves his work unfinished. ... A quibble was to him the fatal Cleopatra for which he lost the world, and was content to lose it." embittered...
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Shakespeare Survey, Volume 46

Stanley Wells - Drama - 2002 - 280 pages
...Davis's classic essay, 'Women on Top', in Society and Culture in Early Modem France (Stanford, 1975). golden apple for which he will always turn aside from his career, or stoop from his elevation'.3 In employing this terminology of swerve, fall, and decline, Johnson touches on...
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Quotation Marks

Marjorie B. Garber - Literary Collections - 2003 - 306 pages
...engulf him in the mire It has some malignant power over his mind, and tts fascinations are irresistible. Whatever be the dignity or profundity of his disquisition, whether he be enlargtng knowledge or exalting affection, whether he be amusing attention wtth incidents, or enchaining...
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Renaissance Figures of Speech

Sylvia Adamson, Gavin Alexander, Katrin Ettenhuber - History - 2007 - 306 pages
...him in the mire. It has some malignant power over his mind, and its fascinations are irresistible ... A quibble is the golden apple for which he will always turn aside from his career, or stoop from his elevation. A quibble poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight, that he was content...
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The Tragedy of King Lear: With Classic and Contemporary Criticisms

William Shakespeare - Literary Criticism - 2008 - 340 pages
...him in the mire. It has some malignant power over his mind, and its fascinations are irresistible. Whatever be the dignity or profundity of his disquisition,...he will always turn aside from his career, or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight, that he was content...
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