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" tis too horrible ! The weariest and most loathed worldly life, ^ That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. "
The Plays of William Shakspeare - Page 374
by William Shakespeare - 1822
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Shakespeare, the King's Playwright: Theater in the Stuart Court, 1603-1613

Alvin B. Kernan - Drama - 1997 - 230 pages
...To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod;... ... 'tis too horrible! The weariest and most loathed worldly...on nature is a paradise To what we fear of death. (3.1.117) In the face of the voracity of human appetites and the overwhelming fear of death, the law...
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Aging and Old Age

Richard A. Posner, Circuit Judge U S Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and Senior Lecturer Richard A Posner - Family & Relationships - 1995 - 375 pages
...shall see in chapter 9.) We can thus appreciate the biological sense of Claudio's observation that "The weariest and most loathed worldly life / That...nature is a paradise / To what we fear of death." " There is an economic as well as a biological reason why the old should dread, or should behave in...
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Eyes of Love: The Gaze in English and French Paintings and Novels, 1840-1900

Stephen Kern - Art - 1996 - 283 pages
...Measure for Measure, tn, i, that express Claudio's thoughts: Ay, but to die, and go we know not where: 'Tis too horrible! The weariest, and most loathed...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. 31 Joseph A. Kestner provides compelling evidence that Leighton was sexually suppressed and homoerotic...
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Shakespeare's Other Lives: An Anthology of Fictional Depictions of the Bard

Maurice O'Sullivan - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 223 pages
...viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendant world; or to be worse than worst Of those that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine...on nature is a paradise To what We fear of death. A young fool in a dungeon whining out That his dear body, which is all he knows, Having no hint of the...
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Duologues for All Accents and Ages

Eamonn Jones, Jean Marlow - Performing Arts - 2002 - 208 pages
...round about The pendent world; or to be worse than worst Of those that lawless and incertain thought Imagine howling - 'tis too horrible. The weariest...on nature is a paradise To what we fear of death. ISABELLA Alas, alas! CLAUDIO Sweet sister, let me live. What sin you do to save a brother's life, Nature...
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Coming of Age in Shakespeare

Marjorie B. Garber - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 248 pages
...what Kubler-Ross describes as 'taking into account impending losses'.7 Tis too horrible!' he exclaims, The weariest and most loathed worldly life / That...on nature is a paradise / To what we fear of death' (127-31). At last the 'friar' intervenes once more, to dispel all hope: Tomorrow you must die' (168),...
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On Measure for Measure: An Essay in Criticism of Shakespeare's Drama

Lawrence J. Ross - Drama - 1997 - 182 pages
...import. Claudio (for instance) speaks so eloquently not of what he fears of death but of what we do. The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. (128-31) The first move of the dialogue affirms that the opening statement of the scene in the Friar's...
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Loss, Bereavement and Grief: A Guide to Effective Caring

Bob Spall, Stephen Callis - Medical - 1997 - 198 pages
...with clients? How can I translate this into more effective practice? Thinking about our own death 6 The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. William Shakespeare: Measure for Measure Act III Scene 1 The meanings we assign to death help shape...
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Shakespearean Power and Punishment: A Volume of Essays

Gillian Murray Kendall - Drama - 1998 - 219 pages
...about / The pendent world," hardly encourages the happy surrender of the worldly self to dispersal: The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. (3.1.117-31) So it is not surprising that Claudio finds no consolation in the disguised Duke's argument...
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What is the Dharma?: The Essential Teachings of the Buddha

Sangharakshita (Bhikshu) - Philosophy - 1998 - 253 pages
...will choose to die, such is our terror of the inevitable conclusion to our own existence: The meanest and most loathed worldly life, That age, ache, penury,...Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death.*2 People do not always feel ready to die. They are sorry to leave the scene of their labours...
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