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" tis too horrible ! The weariest and most loathed worldly life, ^ That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. "
The Plays of William Shakspeare - Page 374
by William Shakespeare - 1822
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Style: Essays on Renaissance and Restoration Literature and Culture in ...

Harriett Hawkins - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 296 pages
...to Isabella: Ay, but to die, and go we know not where; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot; . . . The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...on nature is a paradise To what we fear of death." (III.i.ll9-20;130-33) 8 Or, again, if Claudio is legally liable for the death penalty, then why not...
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Mystery of the Black Tower

John Palmer (Jun.) - Fiction - 2005 - 183 pages
...viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendant world, or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine...most loathed worldly life That age, ache, penury, imprisonment, Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. SHAKESPEARE. ON perceiving...
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Kill All the Lawyers?: Shakespeare's Legal Appeal

Daniel Kornstein - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 274 pages
...courts and because there had been no conviction rendered and no sentence imposed. The weariest and the most loathed worldly life That age, ache, penury,...on nature is a paradise To what we fear of death. (3.1.129-32) Angelo, ever the proponent of law and order, sees the death penalty as a form of deterrence....
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Fundamental Rights and Democratic Governance: Essays in Caribbean Jurisprudence

Simeon C. R. McIntosh - Capital punishment - 2005 - 340 pages
...eloquent soliloquy on the psychological stress of death row in Measure for Measure: The weariest and the most loathed worldly life That age, ache, penury,...Can lay on nature is a paradise To what we fear of death.159 Claudio's expressed terror at being executed corresponds to a punishment being cruel and...
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Forbidden Words: Taboo and the Censoring of Language

Keith Allan, Kate Burridge - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2006
...supernatural force were at work. Censoring the language of death Of those that lawless and uncertain thought Imagine howling - 'tis too horrible! The weariest...on nature is a paradise To what we fear of death. (Shakespeare, Measure for Measure, III.i.118) Death is a fear-based taboo. There is fear of the loss...
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The Cambridge Introduction to Shakespeare

Emma Smith - Literary Criticism - 2007
...round about The pendent world or to be worse than worst Of those that lawless and incertain thought Imagine howling; 'tis too horrible. The weariest and...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. (3.1.116—32) This little kernel at the heart of the play is a bit of the almost contemporaneous play...
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Looking for Hamlet

Marvin W. Hunt - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 256 pages
...worse than worst Of those that lawless and uncertain thought Imagine howling — 'tis too horrible! OO The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...on nature is a paradise To what we fear of death. Hamlet, in contrast to the genuinely terrified Claudio of Measure for Measure, commands a unique authority...
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Unholy Writ: An Infidel's Critique of the Bible

T. Joyner Drolsum - Religion - 2007 - 392 pages
...where; To lie in cold obstruction and to rot; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod .... The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...Can lay on nature is a paradise To what we fear of death."33 Of course, these feelings are not unremitting. There are times when this same irreligious...
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The Suffering of Love: Christ's Descent Into the Hell of Human Hopelessness

Regis Martin - Religion - 2007 - 254 pages
...imprisoned in the viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world. . . . The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...Can lay on nature is a paradise To what we fear of death.56 "There is no other", Lynch reminds us, "who could say as authentically, of human time, as...
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The Cambridge Introduction to Shakespeare's Comedies

Penny Gay - Literary Criticism - 2008
...where, To lie in cold obstruction and to rot, This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod . . . The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. . . . Sweet sister, let me live. (3.1.116-33) Isabella can save Claudio if she submits to Angelo 's...
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