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" tis too horrible ! The weariest and most loathed worldly life, ^ That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. "
The Plays of William Shakspeare - Page 374
by William Shakespeare - 1822
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The Cambridge Book of Poetry and Song

Charlotte Fiske Bates - American poetry - 1832 - 882 pages
...viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world: or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death ! [From The Tempest.] JfA'Z) OF ALL EARTHLY GLORY. OUR revels now are ended: these our actors. As I...
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The plays and poems of Shakspeare [according to the text of E ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1832
...worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Indulgence of a vicious appetite. * Lastingly. Imagine howling ! — 'tis too horrible ! The weariest...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. Isa. Alas ! alas ! Clau. Sweet sister, let me live : What sin you do to save a brother's life, Nature...
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Our Island: Comprising Forgery, a Tale; and The Lunatic, a Tale ...

Humphry William Woolrych - England - 1833
...the two passengers, started immediately for the gaol at a rapid rate. CHAPTER XVIII. cojrtiusioir. " The weariest and most loathed- worldly life That age,...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death." Measure for Measure. WE have now arrived at the end of our history. The reader must have already anticipated...
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Transatlantic Sketches, Comprising Visits to the Most Interesting ..., Volume 1

Sir James Edward Alexander - British Guiana - 1833
...England next day, and was off without previously arranging his affairs; he being of opinion that — " The weariest and most loathed worldly life, That age,...imprisonment Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what he feared of death." I started one morning at an early hour to breakfast with the Governor, and visit...
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The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: Including a Journal of His Tour to the ...

James Boswell - Authors, English - 1835
...viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death." Our author seems likewise to have remembered a couplet in the " Aureng-Zebe" of Dryden : — " Death...
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The life of Samuel Johnson ... including A journal of his tour to ..., Volume 10

James Boswell - 1835
...viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world ; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death." Our author seems likewise to have remembered a couplet in the " Aureng-Zebe" of Dryden : — " Death...
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Johnsoniana; or, Supplement to Boswell [ed. by J.W. Croker].

John Wilson Croker - 1836
...viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world ; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death." Our author seems likewise to have remembered a couplet in the " Aureng-Zebe" of Dryden : — " Death...
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The Metropolitan, Volume 16

English literature - 1836
...undergoing a violent death, need no aggravation of his misery, to make him sensible of his condition. " The weariest and most loathed worldly life, That age,...nature, is a paradise, To what we fear of death." To drag a man out of his solitude, to rate him, and before a congregation of mercenary, cold-hearted...
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The Knickerbocker: Or, New-York Monthly Magazine, Volume 10

American periodicals - 1837
...brains for daily bread : Getting scant dross for the rich ore they give, A FEW THOUGHTS ON FUNERALS. 'Tis too horrible! The weariest and most loathed worldly...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death !' SHAKSPEARE. IN ray morning walk in the country, the other day, a common poorhouse hearse passed...
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The Knickerbocker: Or, New-York Monthly Magazine, Volume 10

American periodicals - 1837
...for daily bread : Getting scant dross for the rich ore they give, A FEW THOUGHTS ON FCNERALS, "TĦa too horrible! The weariest and most loathed worldly...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death !' SHAKSPEARE. IN my morning walk in the country, the other day, a common poorhouse hearse passed me....
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