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" tis too horrible ! The weariest and most loathed worldly life, ^ That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. "
The Plays of William Shakspeare - Page 374
by William Shakespeare - 1822
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Johnsoniana

John Wilson Croker - 1842 - 529 pages
...viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death." Our author seems likewise to have remembered a couplet in the " Aureng-Zebe" of Dryden: — " Death...
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1843
...viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world ; or to be worse than worst Of those that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. Isab. Alas, alas! Claud. Sweet sister, let me live : What sin you do to save a brother's life, Nature...
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Colloquies, desultory and diverse, but chiefly upon poetry and poets. [by C ...

Christopher Legge Lordan - English poetry - 1843 - 200 pages
...violence round about The pendant world ; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and ineertain thoughts Imagine howling! — 'tis too horrible! The...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death.' " The garrulous old man identified himself so perfectly with the shrinking Claudio in the recital of...
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The Churchman; a monthly magazine in defence of the venerable ..., Volume 8

1843
...restless violence about The pendant world, or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and uncertain thoughts Imagine howling ! — 'tis too horrible !...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death." But is not this the result of gazing upon death as from a distance, leaving it to the imagination to...
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Religious and Moral Sentences Culled from the Works of Shakespeare: Compared ...

William Shakespeare, Sir Frederick Beilby Watson - 1843 - 224 pages
...absolute for death ; either death, or life, Shall thereby be the sweeter. AJ HAsriiji rou MEASURE, iii. 1. The weariest and most loathed worldly life, That age,...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. MEASURE FOR MEASURE, iii. 1. Just Death, kind umpire of men's miseries, With sweet enlargement, doth...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 6

American literature - 1867
...viewless winds, And blown with restless violence about The pendant world ; or to be worse than worst Of those that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine...on Nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. Each of Shakspeare's contemporaries and successors among the dramatists commanded a style of his own...
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The Metropolitan, Volume 41

English literature - 1844
...viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world ; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death.' "Must we, then, remain in this state of uncertainty, upon a subject so vital and important ? Must we,...
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Colloquies, Desultory, But Chiefly Upon Poetry and Poets: Between an Elder ...

Christopher Legge Lordan - English poetry - 1844 - 268 pages
...violence round about The pendant world ; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and ineertain thoughts Imagine howling ! — 'tis too horrible !...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death !" ' The garrulous Old Man identified himself so perfectly with the shrinking Claudio in the recital...
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Colloquies, Desultory, But Chiefly Upon Poetry and Poets: Between an Elder ...

Christopher Legge Lordan - English poetry - 1844 - 268 pages
...world ; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine howling I — 'tis too horrible ! The weariest and most loathed...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death !" The garrulous Old Man identified himself so perfectly with the shrinking Claudio in the recital...
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Colloquies, desultory and diverse, but chiefly upon poetry and poets. [by C ...

Christopher Legge Lordan - 1844
...or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine howling ! — 'tig too horrible ! The weariest and most loathed worldly...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death !" The garrulous Old Man identified himself so perfectly with the shrinking Claudio in the recital...
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