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" Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod ; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling... "
The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ... - Page 71
by William Shakespeare - 1883
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A Plea for Religion and the Sacred Writings: Addressed to the Disciples of ...

David Simpson - Apologetics - 1825 - 345 pages
...the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice; To be imprison'd in the viewless winds, And blown...that lawless and incertain thoughts Imagine howling: 'Tistoo horrible! The weariest and most loathed worldly life, That age, ache, penury, imprisonment,...
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The story of a life, by the author of Scenes and impressions in Egypt and Italy

Joseph Moyle Sherer - 1825
...I felt, although in the extremity of wretchedness, the truth of that mighty master's verse : — « The weariest, and most loathed worldly life, That...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death." and thus I bore with my chains and stripes. It chanced one morning, as the Dey rode past us, that he...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare, Volumes 11-12

William Shakespeare - Theater - 1826 - 960 pages
...delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In tluilling regions of thick-ribbed ice ; d ach, penury, and imprisonment Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. Isab. Alas...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Measure for measure. Midsummer ...

William Shakespeare - 1826
...floods, or to reside In thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice23; To be imprison'd in the viewless24 winds, And blown with restless violence round about...weariest and most loathed worldly life, That age, ach, penury, and imprisonment Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. hub. Alas!...
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Measure for measure. Much ado about nothing. Midsummer-night's dream. Love's ...

William Shakespeare - 1826
...floods, or to reside In thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice23; To be imprison'd in the viewless24 winds, And blown with restless violence round about...weariest and most loathed worldly life, That age, ach, penury, and imprisonment Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. Isab. Alas...
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Literary and Miscellaneous Memoirs, Volume 1

Joseph Cradock - France - 1826
...imprisoned in the viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world ; The weariest and most loathed worldly life, That age,...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death !" Friend. 1 have heard you before repeat those lines with energy, and have felt their force ; but...
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Literary gems [ed. by J.S.].

Literary gems - 1826
...be imprison'd in the viewless winds, ' And blown with restless violence round about. ;: The pendant world ; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless...!—'tis too horrible ! The weariest and most loathed wordly life, .. .'» uui That age, ache, penury, and imprisonment, • '*»Can lay on nature, is a...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 791 pages
...Го bathe m fiery floods, or to reEide [n thrilling regions of thick ribbed ice; To be Imprison 'd ach, penury, and imprisonment лзп lay on nature, is a paradise о what we fear of death. I. util....
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The Roué, Volume 2

Samuel Beazley - 1828
...where ; * To lie in cold obstruction and to rot : This sensible warm notion to become A kneaded clod. 'Tis too horrible ! The weariest and most loathed...on nature, is a Paradise To what we fear of death. SlIAKSPEARE. THE circumstances which had led to the rencontre detailed in the last chapter were simply...
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The Roué ...

Samuel Beazley - 1828
...cold obntructinn and to rot: This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod. 'Tis too horrible t The weariest and most loathed worldly life, That age,...on nature, is a Paradise To what we fear of death. SHAKSPEARE. THE circumstances which had led to the rencontre detailed in the las,t chapter were simply...
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