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" Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod ; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling... "
The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ... - Page 71
by William Shakespeare - 1883
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Johnsoniana: Or, Supplement to Boswell: Being Anecdotes and Sayings of Dr ...

John Wilson Croker - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1842 - 529 pages
...the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice; To be imprison'd in the viewless winds, And blown...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death." Our author seems likewise to have remembered a couplet in the " Aureng-Zebe" of Dryden: — " Death...
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The works of William Shakespeare, the text formed from an entirely ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1842
...the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice ; To be imprison'd in the viewless winds, And blown...worst Of those that lawless and incertain thoughts meant a welt or border of a garment," " because (says Minsheu) it guard* and keeps the garment from...
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The Saint Petersburg English Review of Literature, the Arts and ..., Volume 1

1842
...; To be imprison'd in the viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendant world; or to be worse than worst Of those, that lawless...weariest and most loathed worldly life, That age, ach, penury, and imprisonment. Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. (') Flowed....
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Shakespeare: A Life in Drama

Stanley Wells - Biography & Autobiography - 1997 - 403 pages
...spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling region of thick-ribbed ice; To be imprisoned in the viewless winds, And blown with restless violence...worse than worst Of those that lawless and incertain thought Imagine howling - 'tis too horrible! (3.1.109-28) Isabella rejects his plea for life in terms...
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Famous Lines: A Columbia Dictionary of Familiar Quotations

Robert Andrews - Reference - 1997 - 625 pages
...spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling region of thick-ribb'd ice; To be imprisoned in the viewless winds, And blown with restless violence...worse than worst Of those that lawless and incertain thought Imagine howling — 'tis too horrible! The weariest and most loath'd worldly life That age,...
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Coming of Age in Shakespeare

Marjorie B. Garber - Literary Criticism - 1997 - 248 pages
...what Kubler-Ross describes as 'taking into account impending losses'.7 Tis too horrible!' he exclaims, The weariest and most loathed worldly life / That...on nature is a paradise / To what we fear of death' (127-31). At last the 'friar' intervenes once more, to dispel all hope: Tomorrow you must die' (168),...
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On Measure for Measure: An Essay in Criticism of Shakespeare's Drama

Lawrence J. Ross - Drama - 1997 - 182 pages
...import. Claudio (for instance) speaks so eloquently not of what he fears of death but of what we do. The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. (128-31) The first move of the dialogue affirms that the opening statement of the scene in the Friar's...
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Loss, Bereavement and Grief: A Guide to Effective Caring

Bob Spall, Stephen Callis - Medical - 1997 - 198 pages
...with clients? How can I translate this into more effective practice? Thinking about our own death 6 The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. William Shakespeare: Measure for Measure Act III Scene 1 The meanings we assign to death help shape...
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Shakespearean Power and Punishment: A Volume of Essays

Gillian Murray Kendall - Drama - 1998 - 219 pages
...about / The pendent world," hardly encourages the happy surrender of the worldly self to dispersal: The weariest and most loathed worldly life That age,...on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death. (3.1.117-31) So it is not surprising that Claudio finds no consolation in the disguised Duke's argument...
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What is the Dharma?: The Essential Teachings of the Buddha

Sangharakshita (Bhikshu) - Philosophy - 1998 - 253 pages
...will choose to die, such is our terror of the inevitable conclusion to our own existence: The meanest and most loathed worldly life, That age, ache, penury,...Can lay on nature, is a paradise To what we fear of death.*2 People do not always feel ready to die. They are sorry to leave the scene of their labours...
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