Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it is compelled by force to change that state. "
Elements of Natural Philosophy - Page 65
by William Thomson Baron Kelvin, Peter Guthrie Tait - 1873 - 279 pages
Full view - About this book

The Data of Jurisprudence

William Galbraith Miller - Jurisprudence - 1903 - 477 pages
...of nature in material things. Such a statement may be found in Newton's first law of motion : — " Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform...motion in a straight line, except in so far as it is compelled by impressed forces to change this state." This law, though applied by Newton only to...
Full view - About this book

Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat: A Twelve Weeks' College Course

Robert Andrews Millikan - Gases - 1903 - 242 pages
...Third with the subjoined scholium contains two. Newton,s statement of these laws is as follows : I. Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line except in so far as it is compelled by force to change that state. II. (Rate of) change of (quantity of) motion is proportional...
Full view - About this book

A Text-book of Applied Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, Volume 2

Andrew Jamieson - Mechanics, Applied - 1903
...be stated as follows : — LAW I. (La^o of Inertia). — Every body continues in a state of rest, or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it may be compelled to change that state by external force acting on it. LAW II. (Law of Force and Motion). — Rate of...
Full view - About this book

Mechanics

John Cox - Mechanics - 1904 - 332 pages
...pound-weights, except when there can be no possible danger of confusion. 117. Newton's Laws of Motion. Law I. Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform...motion in a straight line, except in so far as it is compelled to change that state by impressed force. This is merely Galileo's principle of Inertia,...
Full view - About this book

The Critical Review of Theological & Philosophical Literature, Volume 14

Stewart Dingwall Fordyce Salmond - Books - 1904
...support it grandly by Newton's first law of motion, "every body perseveres in its state of rest, or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it is compelled by forces to change that state". The assumption of the Instability of the Homogeneous...
Full view - About this book

A Companion to Wittgenstein's 'Tractatus'

Max Black - Philosophy - 1964 - 450 pages
...Eddington expresses this version (which he accepts) , ' Every body continues in its state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it doesn't' (Physical World, p. 124). On this view, the reference to 'force' in the principles of mechanics...
Limited preview - About this book

The Twentieth Century, Volume 12

Nineteenth century - 1882
...principle in science that every body, or particle, or mass of matter perseveres in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except in so far as it is made to change that state by external forces. This is Newton's first law of motion ; and if there...
Full view - About this book

Journal of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Volume 31

Health - 1960
...For example, force is based on three fundamental laws known as Newton 's laws of motion: (1) A body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line except insofar as it is compelled by forces to change that state ; (2) The acceleration of a body is proportional...
Full view - About this book

The Evolution of Psychological Theory: A CRITICAL HISTORY O

Richard Lowry - 1982 - 237 pages
...physical principles, Newton's three laws of motion. The first is often spoken of as the law of inertia: Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform motion in a straight line, except as it is compelled by force to change that state. Before passing on to the remaining two laws of motion,...
Limited preview - About this book

Jean D'alembert-Science

Hankins - Medical - 1990 - 260 pages
...d'Alembert's first law reduces to the tautology that 'every body continues in its state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line except in so far as it doesn't'.6 The same criticism can, of course, be made of Newton's first law ; but Newton clearly believed...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF