Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book

Front Cover
U of Nebraska Press, 2007 - Cooking - 607 pages
In Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book American readers, gardeners, and food lovers will find everything they've always wanted to know about the history and romance of seventy-five different vegetables, from artichokes to yams, and will learn how to use them in hundreds of different recipes, from the exquisitely simple ?Broccoli Salad? to the engagingly esoteric ?Game with Tomato and Chocolate Sauce.? Jane Grigson gives basic preparation and cooking instructions for all the vegetables discussed and recipes for eating them in every style from least adulterated to most adorned. This is by no means a book intended for vegetarians alone, however. There are recipes for ?Cassoulet,? ?Chicken Gumbo,? and even Dr. William Kitchiner's 1817 version of ?Bubble and Squeak? (fried beef and cabbage). Jane Grigson's Vegetable Book is a joy to read and a pleasure to use in the kitchen. It will introduce you to vegetables you've never met before, develop your friendship with those you know only in passing, and renew your romance with some you've come to take for granted. This edition has a special introduction for American readers, tables of equivalent weights and measures, and a glossary, which make the book as accessible to Americans as it is to those in Grigson's native England.
 

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Jane Grigson's vegetable book

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Released in 1982 and 1978, respectively, these volumes combined offer nearly 1000 recipes, from banana and bacon rolls to spinach and mushroom pancakes. Just about anything you'd ever want to do with a fruit or vegetable is covered. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Artichoke
15
Aaparagus
30
Asparagus Chicory
41
Asparagus Peas
43
Aubergine
45
Avocado
61
Batavian Endive or Scarole
72
Beans from the new World
74
MarshSamphire or Glasswort
330
Mushrooms
331
Mustard and Cress
333
Nettles
334
New Zealand spinach
336
Okra or Ladys Fingers
337
Onion Shallot and Spring Onion
344
Orache or Mountain Spinach
359

Beet Greens of Spinach Beet
90
Beetroot
91
Broad Beans
103
Broccoli or Sprouting Broccoli
111
Brussels Sprouts
118
Cabbage
125
Cardoon
154
Carrots
160
Cauliflower
175
Celery and Celeriac
185
Celtuce Asparagus Lettuce
195
Chayote
197
Chick Peas
203
Chicorywhite green and red
208
Chinese Artichokes
216
Chinese Leaf
220
Courgettes
227
Cucumber
236
Custard Marrow or Squash
247
Dandelion Leaves
250
Earthnuts of Pignuts
252
Endive
253
Fennel
254
Hamburg Parsley or Parsley Root
263
Hop Shoots
268
Jerusalem Artichokes
271
Kohlrabi or Cabbageturnip
279
Lambs Lettuce or Corn Salad
283
Land Cress
286
Laver
287
Leeks
291
Lentils
303
Lettuce and Lettuce Salad
312
Mangetout Peas or Sugar Peas
325
Parsnips
360
Peas
366
Peppers and ChilliThe Capsicums
377
Potatoes
393
Pumpkin
417
Purslane
430
Radish
432
Red Cabbage
434
Rocket
440
Salad Burnet
441
Salsify and Scorzonera
443
Seakale
451
Sorrel
454
Soya Beans Mung Beans and Bean Sprouts
459
Spinach
462
Spring and Winter Greens
480
Sweetcorn or Maize
482
Sweet Potatoes
493
Swiss Chard and Other Leafbeets
499
Tomatoes
505
Turnips and Swedes
523
Vegetable Marrow
532
Vegetable Spaghetti
535
Watercress
537
Yams
546
APPENDIX
547
Steaming and Blanching Vegetables
548
Stocks
550
Savoury Butters
551
Sauces
552
Stuffings
562
Batters
567
INDEX
571
Copyright

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Page ix - Every book is, in an intimate sense, a circular letter to the friends of him who writes it. They alone take his meaning ; they find private messages, assurances of love, and expressions of gratitude dropped for them in every corner.
Page ix - Most people spoil garden things by overboiling them. All things that are green should have a little crispness for if they are overboiled they neither have any sweetness or beauty.

About the author (2007)

Jane Grigson (1928?90) was brought up in the northeast of England, where there is a strong tradition of good eating. In 1968 she began writing cookery articles for the Observer Colour Magazine; the Bison Books edition of Good Things is a collection from this highly successful series. Jane Grigson's Fruit Book is also available in a Bison Books edition. Grigson posthumously received the 2009 James Beard Foundation Cookbook Hall of Fame Book Award for her entire body of work. Amy Sherman studied the culinary arts in Italy and is a San Francisco-based food reviewer and an avid cooking blogger at http://cookingwithamy.blogspot.com/.

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