Gifts

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2004 - Juvenile Fiction - 274 pages
Scattered among poor, desolate farms, the clans of the Uplands possess gifts. Wondrous gifts: the ability--with a glance, a gesture, a word--to summon animals, bring forth fire, move the land. Fearsome gifts: They can twist a limb, chain a mind, inflict a wasting illness. The Uplanders live in constant fear that one family might unleash its gift against another. Two young people, friends since childhood, decide not to use their gifts. One, a girl, refuses to bring animals to their death in the hunt. The other, a boy, wears a blindfold lest his eyes and his anger kill.

In this beautifully crafted story, Ursula K. Le Guin writes of the proud cruelty of power, of how hard it is to grow up, and of how much harder still it is to find, in the world's darkness, gifts of light.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Griffin22 - www.librarything.com

Ursula Le Guin has a very distinctive voice. This YA is mostly sad, wistful. Hard lives made harder by dubious choices. Very well written, but it took me several days to read this short novel because it made me sad. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - chelseaknits - LibraryThing

Dark in the way that real YA fiction should be. The various brantors and -mants are a bit difficult to parse at the beginning, but if you just read, the field resolves itself by about forty pages in. Read full review

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274
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275

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About the author (2004)

URSULA K. LE GUIN was born in Berkeley, California, in 1929, and passed away in Portland, Oregon, in 2018. She published over sixty books of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, children's literature, and translation. She was the recipient of a National Book Award, six Hugo and five Nebula awards, and was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters.