Essentials of 16PF Assessment

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John Wiley & Sons, Nov 1, 2003 - Psychology - 320 pages
Complete coverage of the widely used 16PF measure of personality

Essentials of 16PF Assessment is a valuable guide to administering, scoring, and interpreting this popular measure of normal personality. Using the proven Essentials format, Cattell and Schuerger clearly describe how to use the instrument; provide critical information about its validity and reliability; and include helpful guidelines for using the instrument effectively with individuals, couples, and families, in settings ranging from clinical and forensic to corporate environments and other workplaces.

Essentials of 16PF Assessment provides comprehensive coverage of test administration, scoring, and interpretation. As well, this informative resource provides expert assessment of the method's relative strengths and weaknesses, valuable advice on its clinical applications, and illuminating sample cases.

Like all the volumes in the Essentials of Psychological Assessment series, this book is designed to help busy professionals quickly acquire the knowledge and skills they need to make optimal use of a major psychological assessment inst rument. Each concise chapter features numerous callout boxes highlighting key concepts, bulleted points, and extensive illustrative material, as well as test questions that help you gauge and reinforce your understanding of the information covered.

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Contents

Chapter One OVERVIEW
1
Chapter Two HOW TO ADMINISTER AND SCORE THE 16PF QUESTIONNAIRE
19
Chapter Three THE 16PF QUESTIONNAIRE SCALES
27
Chapter Four HOW TO INTERPRET THE 16PF QUESTIONNAIRE
159
Chapter Five STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF THE 16PF QUESTIONNAIRE
191
Chapter Six CLINICAL COUNSELING AND CONSULTING APPLICATIONS
197
Chapter Seven CAREER AND ORGANIZATIONAL APPLICATIONS
221
Chapter Eight ILLUSTRATIVE CASE REPORTS
249
Annotated Bibliography
295
Index
297
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Page 3 - Cattell (1943) declared that all aspects of human personality which are or have been of importance, interest, or utility have already become recorded in the substance of language.
Page 27 - Scores on the 16PF personality scales are given in "standard-ten" or sten scores, which range from 1 to 10, with a mean of 5.5 and a standard deviation of 2.
Page 116 - Testament taught this doctrine, and they believed it thoroughly because it corresponded with what they saw in their own lives and in the lives of those around them, both of sin and of the effects of Divine grace.
Page 91 - Discuss the need to practice these repair strategies, as research has shown that there is a difference between what people say they will do and what they actually do.
Page 221 - ... the first section of this chapter. The second section of this chapter considers fit from the employer's point of view, emphasizing how to choose employees best suited to particular positions.
Page 30 - ... flexible in meeting these needs, and less relaxed in their relationship with children than abstract teachers. Thus, these investigators demonstrated a very clear relationship between a teacher's belief system and his teaching style. Paraskevopoulos found that Jungian character traits, such as Extroversion versus Introversion, Sensing versus Intuition, Thinking versus Feeling, and Judging versus Perceiving, related consistently to teaching style.15 For example, Sensing teachers were perceived...
Page 267 - ... intertwined, with a dynamic relationship among them. For instance, a leader can't manage his emotions well if he has little or no awareness of them. And if his emotions are out of control, then his ability to handle relationships will suffer. Our research has found a system underlying this dynamic.13 In short, self-awareness facilitates both empathy and self-management, and these two, in combination, allow effective relationship management.
Page 255 - He shows so little regard for the rules of conduct associated with conventional standards of behavior that conforming to societal expectations may be difficult for him. Many of the tasks of living usually taken for granted may become optional in his mind. Other people, especially authority figures, may see him as unresponsive to their expectations. Activities that require a willingness to follow rules may make him feel too constricted to participate effectively.
Page 183 - big picture' and envisioning the possibilities therein are among his strongest attributes, and so his intelligence would be best used in work that involves putting ideas together creatively. . . . His innovative temperament is unlikely to be a good match with a large, authoritarian institution or one that is set in its ways. He would fit better in a newly emerging industry or an organization where the lines of authority are not highly structured and policies and procedures are flexible. He also is...
Page 30 - ... an expression of approval or disapproval, indicating the extent to which a person believes him- or herself competent, successful, significant and worthy

About the author (2003)

HEATHER E. P. CATTELL, PhD, is an author of the16PF?? Fifth Edition Questionnaire, published in1994, which she worked on with her father, Raymond Cattell, thedeveloper of the original 16PF??. She has writtenmany articles and chapters on the 16PF?? andcoauthored the 16PF?? Cattell ComprehensivePersonality Interpretation report.
JAMES M. SCHUERGER, PhD, is Professor Emeritus at ClevelandState University. He conducts workshops nationally on the16PF??, worked with Raymond Cattell at theUniversity of Illinois for many years, and is the author of theAdolescent Personality Questionnaire--the juniorversion of the 16PF??.

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