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" The Prince of Cumberland! that is a step On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires: The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be Which the eye fears, when it is... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of the ... - Page 211
by William Shakespeare - 1803
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare: With a Life, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1828
...The hearmg of my wife with your approach ; So, humbly take my leave. Itun. My worthy Cawdnr ! Mach. The prince of Cumberland!— That is a step, On which...[Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant ; SCENE V. Inverness. A Room in Macheth's Castle, Eater LAnY MAcBETH, reading a Letter. Lady M. They...
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The Dramatic Works and Poems of William Shakespeare, with Notes ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1831
...fall down, or else oferleap, [Aside. For in my way it lies. Stan, hide your fires ! Let not light sec /)'in. True, worthy Banquo ; he is fulleo valiant ;* And in hie commendation a I am fed ; It i ; a...
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The Dramatic Works and Poems of William Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1836
...Thai is a step, On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, [Aside. For in my way it lies. S'ars, n in these honest mean habiliments ; Our purses shall...our garments poor; For, 'tis the mind that makes the eve fears, when it is done, to see. [ExiL Dun. True, worthy Uan«juo ; he is full so valiant j4 And...
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Complete Works: With Dr. Johnson's Preface, a Glossary, and an ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1838 - 926 pages
...The hearing of my wife with your approach ; So, humbly take my leave. Dim. My worthy Cawclor ! Maeb. e f F.*it. Dun. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant ; And in his commendations I am fed ; It...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1839
...Cumberland !—That is a step, On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, [Aside. Dun. My worthy Cawdor ! For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires ! Let...the eye fears, when it is done, to see. [Exit. Dun. Tine, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant ; And in his commendations 1 am fed ; It is a banquet to...
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Nugae Literariae: Prose and Verse

Richard Winter Hamilton - Literature - 1841 - 585 pages
...proceed on his journey, to apprise his wife of the Sovereign's approach, puts an end to doubt : •• Stars, hide your fires ! Let not light see my black...hand ! Yet let that be, Which the eye fears, when it it done, to see." Here is the whole plot, — self-wrought, impatient of delay, eager for execution,...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, with notes original and ..., Volume 4

Samuel Weller Singer - 1843
...The prince of Cumberland ! — That is a step, On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap, \_Aside. For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires; Let...[Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant 9 ; And in his commendations I am fed; It is a banquet to me. Let us after him, Whose care is gone...
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The family Shakespeare [expurgated by T. Bowdler]. in which those words are ...

William Shakespeare - 1843
...For in my way it lies. Stars hide your fires ! L<4 not light sec my black and deep desires : 1Ъе s; For pale they look with fear, as witnessing The...thy cheeks Blush for pure shame, to counterfeit ou it a banquet to me. Let us after him, Whose care is gone before to bid us welcome : It is 3 peerless...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 6

American literature - 1867
...similar adjurations, of various expression, but almost equal poetic beauty : — " Stars, hide yonr fires ! Let not light see my black and deep desires...let that be Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see!1' In Ibe very next scene, we have the invocation to darkness with which Lady Macbeth closes her...
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Dramatic Works and Poems, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1847
...Macb. The prince of Cumberland ! — That in a slep, On which I must fall down, or else o'orleap, [Ande For in my way it lies. Stars, hide your fires ! Let...[Exit. Dun. True, worthy Banquo ; he is full so valiant ;4 And in his commendations I am fed ; It is a banquet to me. Let us after him, Whose care is gone...
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