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" He must have been a man of a most wonderful comprehensive nature, because, as it has been truly observed of him, he has taken into the compass Of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in... "
Blackwood's Magazine - Page 630
1845
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: Including ..., Volume 9

Alexander Chalmers - English poetry - 1810
...him, he has taken into the compass of bis Canterbury) Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...from each other; and not only in their inclinations, butin their very physiogno.-.ies and persons. Baptists Porta could not have described their natures...
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: Including ..., Volume 9

Alexander Chalmers - English poetry - 1810
...Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in lib age. Not a single character has escaped him. All -his...from each other; and not only in their inclinations, butin their very phy«iognouiics and persons. Baptista Porta could not have described their natures...
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper;: Dryden, Smith, Duke ...

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1810
...of him, he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...single character has escaped him. All his pilgrims are seterally distinguished from each other; and not only in their inclinations, butin their very physiognomies...
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The Poetical Works of John Dryden., Esq: Containing Original Poems ..., Volume 3

John Dryden - 1811
...nation, in his age. Not a Jingle character has efcaped him. All his pilgrims are feverally diftinguiflied from each other ; and not only in their inclinations, but in their very phyfiognomies and perfons. Baptifta Porta could not have defcribed their natures better, than by the...
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An Historical Sketch of the Progress of Knowledge in England: From the ...

James George Barlace - England - 1819 - 358 pages
...taken mto the compass of this poem, the various manners " and humours of the English nation at that age. Not a single " character has escaped him, all his pilgrims are distinguished " from each other both in their characters and persons. The " matter• and manner of...
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Retrospective Review, and Historical and Antiquarian Magazine, Volume 9

English literature - 1824
...that " he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales, the various manners and humours, as we now call them, of the whole English nation in his age ; not a single character has escapedhim. All his pilgrims are severally distinguished from each other, not only in their inclinations,...
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The Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected in Eighteen Volumes, Volume 11

John Dryden, Walter Scott - 1821
...him, he has taken into the compass of his " Canterbury Tales" the various manners and humours (as we now call them) of the whole English nation, in his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their dif* The famous Italian physiognomist....
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The Retrospective Review, Volume 9

Books - 1824
...that " he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales, the various manners and humours, as we now call them, of the whole English nation in his...pilgrims are severally distinguished from each other, not only in their inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta could not...
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The retrospective review, Volume 9

1824
...that " he has taken into the compass of his Canterbury Tales, the various manners and humours, as we now call them, of the whole English nation in his...pilgrims are severally distinguished from each other, not only in their inclinations, but in their very physiognomies and persons. Baptista Porta could not...
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The monuments and genii of st. Paul's cathedral and of Westminster ..., Volume 1

George Lewis Smyth - 1826
...him, he has taken into the compass of his ' Canterbury Tales' the various manners and humours, as we now call them, of the whole English nation in his...the marks which the poet gives them. The matter and manner of their tales, and of their telling, are so suited to their different educations, humours and...
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